The Towers Complex
FRIENDS OF BUCKDEN TOWERS (FOBT)
A registered charity that assists in the preservation of the historic buildings collectively known as Buckden Towers, Bugden Towers, Buckden Palace or Bugden Palace in the County of Cambridgeshire, UK
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Registered Charity Number:  273480
First Registered: 5 May 1977  
Copyright © FOBT 1999 - 2013
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GALLERY 1 - OLD PICTURES & PLANS OF THE TOWERS

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An old postcard showing The Towers viewed from the West. The moat, extending between the Tower and St Mary's Church, and the causeway between the Inner and Outer Gatehouses can clearly be seen and the Palace can just be seen to the left of the Tower.
The Towers viewed from the West. The moat, extending between the Tower and St Mary's Church, and the causeway between the Inner and Outer Gatehouses can clearly be seen and the Palace can just be seen to the left of the Tower.
The Towers viewed from the East. The picture was taken before the northern end of the Inner Gatehouse was reconstructed with material from two 15th century houses by Dr Robert Holmes Edleston, who bought the property in 1919.
The Ground Plan of Buckden Palace in 1838. It was in this year that the Diocesan Commissioners decided that the Palace was too big for their needs and part of the Inner Gatehouse and main Palace were pulled down and the building materials sold in auction with many of the internal fictures, fittings and furniture.
The Ground Plan of Buckden Palace in 1926. The darker outlines in the plan indicate remaining ancient buildings and walls. It can be seen that The Great Tower, southern part of the Inner Gatehouse and the wall between these two buildings were all that remained standing in what had been the central area of the Palace.
A modern reproduction of the Ground Plan of Buckden Palace as it was pre-1838. Note: The Victorian House was built on the site of the Great Hall, the King's Lodge and the the Barn did not survive the 1838 destruction, the Chapel was destroyed and the 4 fish ponds were amalgamated into one in the latter half of the 20th century.
The Inner Gatehouse. Note the piles of stones stacked up against the walls.
The Inner Gatehouse. The north extension to the Gatehouse is not present, but the arch under the bridge leading into the Gatehouse is much more exposed than it is today, indicating that the moat on the south side of the bridge had not been filled in.
The Inner Gatehouse and Victorian House. Note there is nos sign of the moat and the north wing of the Inner Gatehouse had not been reconstucted at the time of the photograph, allowing the House to be seen.
The Inner Gatehouse. Note the lampholder (not a basketball hoop) above the arch, the unidentifiable farmyard-like structures visible through the archway and the partially filled in moat.
                    
A Family Group in front of an archway. Note the ruins in the background.
Nobility arriving at The Towers for an event, perhaps the 1932 Pageant. Note the Band to the right in the background.
A large gathering at The Towers for an event, perhaps the 1932 Pageant.
The original engraving made circa 1833 by George Hollis (1798-1842) shows the Great Dining Room in the Palace. There is a cabinet pipe organ situated on the right, which is why the engraving featured in "Robbins Organ Archive" and was reproduced in the "Gentlemen's Magazine", Volume 1, Chapter 15, March 1841. The illustration and accompanying text shown was provided to Rev Father Mahon (Superior and Parish Priest) in 1976 by Eduard R. Robbins of Haywards Heath, West Sussex.